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The Official Photography Thread.

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#81
MightyMichelle

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ooo

I've wanted to get a polariser!
Can't wait to see stuff from it!

#82
Syntra

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QUOTE (Nevermore @ Aug 9 2007, 10:24 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Syntra no offence but you have done nothing but sound like a giant douchebag and then make excuses as to why you have no more interesting photos..

I live in an incredibly boring town but I still manage to get interesting photos. Sure I dont have fun taking photos of sunsets and other assorted water horizons but its all ive got around here so I make the most of it.

There is never a boring place. Im sure there is somewhere close to you that is interesting or that you can make interesting..

In other news, I worked mad over time today so im going out to buy an SB-600 flash and a polarising filter if the shop has one in stock tommorrow. I guess ill post some pics I take with my new loot.

But I Can't get out there and do what I love because I live in the smallest town ever. Literally. What do you want me to do, shoot Corn Fields? Plus I'm a shy photographer. Thats one of the reasons I love landscapes so much. But mostly cause I love Nature.

Well I suppose I could shoot cornfields. But I can't get around because if you haven't noticed, I'm 14. Now I dunno if 14 year olds can drive over in Aussie land, but they can't here. So yeah. GLHF with that. And I still think your photos are good, I just like to be mean during critique. icon_smile.gif

But yeah, Have fun with that Polarizer man, there a really good tool.

But MightyMichelle I agree with the Denw0 thing. I think he needs to crop it to just the one goose/duck though, but thats just me.
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#83
Nevermore

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QUOTE (Syntra @ Aug 10 2007, 06:56 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
But I Can't get out there and do what I love because I live in the smallest town ever. Literally. What do you want me to do, shoot Corn Fields? Plus I'm a shy photographer. Thats one of the reasons I love landscapes so much. But mostly cause I love Nature.

Well I suppose I could shoot cornfields. But I can't get around because if you haven't noticed, I'm 14. Now I dunno if 14 year olds can drive over in Aussie land, but they can't here. So yeah. GLHF with that. And I still think your photos are good, I just like to be mean during critique. icon_smile.gif

But yeah, Have fun with that Polarizer man, there a really good tool.

But MightyMichelle I agree with the Denw0 thing. I think he needs to crop it to just the one goose/duck though, but thats just me.



( not taken by me, by a friend TekieB )

Cornfields can be interesting icon_razz.gif

And yeah I know a dude that lives in the middle of nowhere out in the country in the US so he goes around taking photos of barns and shit like that


( J mel )

So yeah you should use your imagination.. im sure a boring photo of your town could look interesting to some people.

or.. ride a bike icon_razz.gif

#84
tIb

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There is some quite good stuff in here. I find that if you're not taking any photographs or you're too shy or whatever then set yourself a brief. Give yourself an assignment and go out and fulfill it as best you can or in as interesting way as possible. When I'm feeling shy I force myself to go out and take photos of strangers and I make sure people know I'm taking photos. Even if you're really nervous or just not sure act like you're supposed to be there and you know exactly what you're doing.

I try and always work with a tripod even if I don't need it. It slows me down and forces me to think about what I'm shooting. It also lends some legitimacy to what you're doing and people assume you're pro.

Also I think rather than bickering over why your photos aren't very good or if your's are better than someone else's you should be thinking about what's good in your photos and what makes it good. Just photograph as much as possible and look at other people's work and draw inspiration. Photographers I try and draw inspiration from are Henri Cartier Bresson, James Nachtwey, Ansel Adams to an extent, Bill Brandt and Robert Capa. Just find photographers you like and work out why you like them, what makes them good and try and incorporate that into your thinking.

But these are just the poorly arranged and ineloquent thoughts of a photography student.
fuck off nosy

#85
XenoX101

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QUOTE (denwO @ Aug 4 2007, 11:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
denwo awesomeness


I love it, keep it up man, the swan shot is great, the fountain sort of divides the shot and the mistyness on the left adds to the "royal" posture of the swan. Nice job.

The drumkit one is also very sexy icon_smile.gif.

#86
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nice insparational post tehre tib, hints taken on board

#87
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QUOTE (Smiler @ Aug 11 2007, 11:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
nice insparational post tehre tib, hints taken on board

xD
fuck off nosy

#88
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Everyone got some critics on theirs, but I didn't get any on mine ... I'm really curious to know what you guys think icon_smile.gif

here's a link to my post: http://www.purepwnage.com/forums/index.php...6167&st=20#

#89
tIb

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*SaPpHiRe*

Nature Photography
I think think these demonstrate a good knack for timing and realising effective photos in your mind's eye. I think if you work on these then they could be really effective. I think the main problem with these is that they're a bit soft, or not quite sharp.

The first one I think would have worked better with a background other than grainy black. I'm not sure if it's your lens but the ladybird (ladybug?) isn't sharp. Maybe try shooting at a smaller aperture, when you're getting that much magnification you really don't get much dof. I also wonder how it would have worked if you'd waited till the ladybird was in full view and not obscured by the petal.

#2. This is a really cool concept, I like the fact you saw this. Perhaps if you'd moved in a little closer and moved the ants to the left of the frame. Again sharpness is a bit of an issue. What I really like is the little ant shadows, I think they make the picture.

#3 Good concept and exceptionally nice timing. It's about half a stop to a stop overexposed and the top of the background is a bit distracting. I hate to bring it up again but sharpness, check your focus and stop down.

#4 I find this a bit crowded. There's too much vying for my attention and it's a bit overexposed.

#5 Again I really like your ideas. I think if you'd moved in closer slightly the ladybug wouldn't be as lost in the leaf. The specular highlights on the bug's back don't really help it either. I've never really shot shiny bugs like that but maybe if you waited for an overcast day or something you wouldn't get that. A little overexposed and not quite sharp.

#6 As cute as it is I think there's something missing. Perhaps if you moved your frame to the right so the ducks are entering from the left and have something to balance the ducks and the water on the left, maybe a stick floating or something, I don't really know. A polarising filter might help here.

#7 Interesting colours but it's a bit crowded. If you want a simple shot like that you really have to make it simple. Some more detail in the sky would have been nice.

#8 This is my favourite in terms of framing and ideas. It's really got something going for it. Problems is it's not sharp. Do you know what shutter speed this was and if it was handheld?

#9 This is a close second in terms of framing and ideas. The right side of the picture is a little distracting because it's too bright, maybe go into photoshop and burn the right side a bit with a big soft brush. Set it to about 8% and do it slowly. This is perfectly legitimate. I like it though. Again not quite sharp though.

People

#1 Interesting set up, very nice. Try and get her face in focus and reduce the intensity of the highlights on her face.

#2 Nice arrangement of people but I don't like the lighting.

#3 Watch the cables on the right. Quite an abstract picture.

#4 Not a brilliant picture but this is awesome practise. Shoot as many of these as possible and make them as interesting as possible. They really help for confidence. (assuming he's a stranger)

#5 Very daring, I like it. Try and get some detail in the highlights though. She also looks a little posed.

#6 Too distracting

#7 Creepy. Nice setup, the highlights are too bright though.

#8 Something hasn't worked. Was it underexposed and you bumped the brightness up?

Misc.

#1 A bit too crowded and it's less moody than it could be.

#2 very good. Nice exposure, it's sharp and the specular highlights really help to show form.



Sorry about my brief comments towards the end I have to go to uni. I think your main problems are sharpess (be it from poor lens, poor focus, too big an aperture or too slow a shutter speed). If you have a tripod use that as much as you can, especially for your nature shots. Exposure is sometimes a problem as well, watch the range of lighting you have in your picture.

You show real promise though, I don't mean my comments to sound harsh, they're just how I think you could improve. You seem to be really good at choosing moments (see the Decisive Moment by Cartier-Bresson) and knowing what will make a good picture. It's just the execution of that idea that sometimes lets you down.
fuck off nosy

#90
Syntra

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I got a couple more shots. One was just something I was trying out. I set my Camera on top of my roof with a 30 second exposure, this is what I got.



And this one I call Surprise Buddha.


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#91
Nevermore

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Got a new flash (Nikon SB-600) and a new lense (Nikkor 50mm f/1.icon_cool.gif a few days ago, has been fun playing around with them.
















I fly out to Scotland tommorrow, hopefully I will get a shitload of pics while I am over there icon_biggrin.gif

#92
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woowoo scotland, where about are you going?

my summer hols jsut finished but i magaged to get a few good pics during them here are soem from teh last couple of weeks

st andrews




loch near inverness, went to inverness for the weekend to see runrig playing at drumnadrochet (loch ness) it was ace! didnt take my camera to the concert because it was muddy




fraserburgh harbor



50mm f1!! that must be great

#93
C&C n00b

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Road signs!!

Smiler: Third picture is really really good.
xfire = amorfous

#94
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thanks tIb icon_smile.gif I really appreciate you taking the time to give me some constructive criticism. Much <333

I haven't taken pics in a while now, I need to get out there and shoot stuff. I'm just a bit bummed out because I only have a wide angle lens with my Canon Rebel XT, and I want a zoom lens really bad... but can't afford one as of yet. bleh...
Plus, I really don't play around much with the whole shutter speeds and aperture features... I don't really understand what they do...

#95
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QUOTE (*SaPpHiRe* @ Aug 21 2007, 01:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
thanks tIb icon_smile.gif I really appreciate you taking the time to give me some constructive criticism. Much <333

I haven't taken pics in a while now, I need to get out there and shoot stuff. I'm just a bit bummed out because I only have a wide angle lens with my Canon Rebel XT, and I want a zoom lens really bad... but can't afford one as of yet. bleh...
Plus, I really don't play around much with the whole shutter speeds and aperture features... I don't really understand what they do...

Switch to M. Set aperture, shutter speed, and iso sensitivity

...read the manual for further help.

#96
MightyMichelle

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QUOTE (*SaPpHiRe* @ Aug 21 2007, 11:47 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
thanks tIb icon_smile.gif I really appreciate you taking the time to give me some constructive criticism. Much <333

I haven't taken pics in a while now, I need to get out there and shoot stuff. I'm just a bit bummed out because I only have a wide angle lens with my Canon Rebel XT, and I want a zoom lens really bad... but can't afford one as of yet. bleh...
Plus, I really don't play around much with the whole shutter speeds and aperture features... I don't really understand what they do...

LOL

Aperature is to set the sensativity for light. The lower the aperature, the more light will be let into the camera.
Shutter speed how long the shutter is actually open for. So that's basically the same as those settings on digital cameras (portrait, action, night) The average portrait shutter speed is 1/100th of a second.

So say you're taking photos of fireworks. You could put the aperature at f/2 and shutter speed for 1sec.
Hope that helps a bit =)

#97
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awesome! thanks for the info icon_smile.gif I will experiment with that and give it a shot. <3<3<3

Oh, and i have a friend who's really pro at doing photo restoration, and he fixed this one for me:

before

after


he did an amaizing job, making the screwed up picture look like i wanted it to look like in the first place lol

#98
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QUOTE (MightyMichelle @ Aug 22 2007, 01:04 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Aperature is to set the sensativity for light. The lower the aperature, the more light will be let into the camera.
Shutter speed how long the shutter is actually open for. So that's basically the same as those settings on digital cameras (portrait, action, night) The average portrait shutter speed is 1/100th of a second.

So say you're taking photos of fireworks. You could put the aperature at f/2 and shutter speed for 1sec.
Hope that helps a bit =)

Most of that post was inaccurate.

Here

Exposure.

Aperture

Unsurprisingly, exposure simply means allowing light to strike your film. The tricky part is knowing how much light you need and how to control the amount of light reaching the film. The former is taken care of by a light meter, usually built in to the camera, and the latter is achieved by means of the aperture and shutter controls on your camera.
You control the exposure by allowing light to pass through the aperture for a given amount of time. Right now we are going to have a look at the way apertures and shutters are used to control exposure but not the other important functions they perform.

Aperture and f-numbers.
The aperture is just a hole whose size can be varied to allow more or less light to pass through it. The size of apertures are expressed in f-numbers. The range of f-numbers follows a standard sequence with each f-number being half as bright, passing half as much light, as the previous one. A typical aperture range may look like this:
f 1.4; f 2; f 2.8; f 4; f5.6; f 8; f 11; f 16; f 22; f 32

There are smaller and larger f-numbers but the actual numbers used are always the same and will maintain a constant value over different lens focal lengths. This just means that f-8, for instance , will always pass the same amount of light no matter what camera or lens you may be using. Similarly, f-16 will pass half as much light as f-11 and f-4 will pass twice as much as f-5.6. The difference in value between one full f-number and the next is known as a 'stop'. If you change aperture from f-8 to f-5.6 you will give your film one stop more exposure.
The smaller the f-number is then the larger the aperture is and the more light it will pass. The f-number is also used as a guide to the light gathering abilities of a lens. Lenses with large maximum apertures ( small f-number ) are described as being 'fast'.
Generally the aperture will always be held open at its maximum irrespective of whatever value you may have set it to and will not actually close down until the moment of exposure. The main reason for this is to produce the brightest image possible onto the focusing screen. To see the aperture in operation you will have to remove the lens, unless you have a preview control, and look through the lens while turning the aperture control ring.

Shutter and Shutter Speeds.

The shutter prevents light from reaching the film until the moment of exposure, when it opens for a predetermined time allowing light passing through the lens aperture to reach the film. Unlike the aperture, which is always in an open position the shutter is always closed. Like the aperture, shutter values or 'speeds' follow a standard sequence with each one being half that of the next, allowing half as much light to pass through. A typical shutter speed range may look like this;
1sec; 1/2sec; 1/4sec; 1/8th; 1/ 15th; 1/30th; 1/60th; 1/125th;
1/250th; 1/500th; 1/1000th; 1/2000th

Shutter speeds are expressed in seconds or fractions of a second. Slow shutter speeds run into seconds while fast shutter speeds will be shorter than 1/500th of a second. In normal photography shutter speeds will probably fall into the range 1/60th to 1/1000th of a second.
As you may have worked out, changing from one shutter speed to the next changes the exposure by one 'stop' in much the same way as changing the aperture.

Now that you know what a 'stop' is you may realise that to change or control exposure you can alter either one and get the same effect. You may even have worked out that you can have loads of combinations of aperture and shutter speeds that will amount to the same exposure.
Here is a wee example:
Your light meter tells you to set your camera to f-8 at 1/125th of a second. You decide that you want to change it. You will find out why you might want to change it later.

You could reduce the aperture by one stop to f-11 (Stop down or close down). Now your film is receiving half as much light as it requires (underexposure). To compensate for this you select a slower shutter speed of 1/60th of a second so it now stays open twice as long as before and passes twice as much light as before.
Or.
You could increase the aperture by one stop to f-5.6 (Open up). Now your film is receiving twice as much light as it requires (overexposure ). To compensate for this you increase your shutter speed to 1/250th of a second so it now stays open for half as long as before and passes half as much light as before.

f-32 1/8th of a second
f-22 1/15th of a second
f-16 1/30th of a second
f-11 1/60th of a second
f-8 1/125th of a second
f-5.6 1/250th of a second
f-4 1/500th of a second
f-2.8 1/1000th of a second
f-2 1/2000th of a second
Alternatively, you could start by changing the shutter speed then altering the aperture to compensate. The important point is that you finish up getting the same exposure.

Film (or digital sensor) sensitivity (ISO)

Here is something else just to confuse you.
In order for your lightmeter to come up with a suitable combination of aperture size and shutter speed it needs to know how sensitive to light a particular film is. A film's sensitivity is known as its ' speed' and is expressed as an ASA/ISO number. The higher the number the more sensitive it is and consequently the less light it needs to form an image. The lower the number the less sensitive it is and the more light it will require. Sensitive films are said to be 'fast' and will have a speed of 400 ASA/ISO or above. Films with low sensitivity are said to be 'slow' and will have a speed of less than 100 ASA/ISO. General purpose films suitable for everyday use fall into the 100-400 ASA/ISO range with 100-200 being the most popular.
Like shutter speeds and aperture sizes, film speeds follow a standard sequence.

25; 50; 100; 200; 400; 800; 1600; 3200

Wouldn't you know it! Film speed goes up in steps just like shutters and apertures. Each one is twice as sensitive as the next. I know you have worked this out already but the difference between one film speed and the next is a 'stop'.
As far as exposure goes all you really need to know about film is its speed. It is very important that you set the correct film speed on your light meter before you start. Most modern cameras read the film speed from a magnetic strip on the film cassette and set the meter accordingly (DX coding). Otherwise you will have to set it yourself using whatever method your camera/meter is equipped with.
NOTE 1) You can set your own iso speed (from 100-1600) on a Canon 350D (the rebel XT.) Find out how; it is very very important.
NOTE 2) The higher the film speed, the more grainy an image becomes, and the less quality it has.

Over and Under Exposure- brief -

Giving your film more exposure than necessary will result in overexposure. Pictures will be pale or light with poor washed out colours.
Giving your film less exposure than necessary will result in under exposure. Pictures will be dark with poor detail in shadow and dark areas.

You will have realised by know that there are three factors involved in controlling exposure.

Film speed. Once set you do not alter on the same roll of film.

Aperture. Which you can increase or decrease.

Shutter speed. Which you can also increase or decrease.
They in turn share another common factor, which crops up a lot in photography, the 'stop'. Changing either of them by one full setting will always half or double the exposure the film receives.
Increasing one and decreasing the other by the same number of 'stops' gets you the same exposure.

Putting it all together.
Here is what will happen when you press the shutter release button:
The mirror will flip up out of the way. (SLR) That is the clunk you hear.
The aperture will 'stop down' to the selected value.
The shutter will open then close.
The mirror will come back down.
The film is wound on by one frame and the shutter is reset. Automatically if the camera has a winder or manually, by you, if it doesn't.
But why ?
You may be wondering why you can't just stick with one film speed, one aperture and just vary the shutter speed or one film speed, one shutter speed and vary the aperture. Well you can, in fact most cameras will allow you to do both of those things. What you need to know is how you do it and more importantly why you would want to do it.

The Shutter and the Aperture.

Of the various controls on your camera the aperture and shutter controls are the ones which are going to give a lot of control over the content of your finished photographs. It is important to understand from the outset what they are each responsible for and how they affect each other. We have already looked at how the aperture and shutter affect exposure and their relationship in that context. As you, hopefully, know you can use many combinations of shutter and aperture yet still retain the same exposure value, so we are now going to take a look at the factors which will influence how you will select a particular combination of shutter and aperture.

-Important-
In a nutshell, the shutter controls movement, which can be subject movement or camera movement (shake), and the aperture controls how much of the scene (from front to back) will be in sharp focus. This area of sharpness is known as the 'depth of field'. Depth of field is actually influenced by two factors: Aperture and focused distance.
Juggling.
Much of the use of aperture and shutter is juggling one with the other. If you want a lot of depth of field you will have to select a small aperture. To counter this you will have to select a shutter speed that will give you the correct exposure. Be sufficiently fast enough to freeze movement within the scene. Be fast enough to prevent camera shake. If you want to capture fast movement you will have to select a reasonably fast shutter speed. To counter this you will have to select an aperture which will give you the correct exposure. Be small enough provide sufficient depth of field.

There will be many occasions where you will have to make compromises, particularly if you are hand holding your camera. Shallow depth of field is fine so long as the most important part of the subject is sharply focused and some subject movement may also be acceptable but camera shake will consign just about anything to the bin. Unless , of course, the picture is very newsworthy or is of personal significance.


I hope that about clears it up a bit...
Uh

Also don't use photoshop if you're trying to get better at photography. I'm not saying photoshop is a bad thing; it's just better to develop the basic skills in photography and not get into the mindset of "well, if I screw this up now I can fix it later in photoshop." You won't learn anything that way.

Saph, You have a 350D. It's digital! Shoot, shoot, review, experiment, and shoot some more. Take advantage of these opportunities no previous generation had!

#99
*SaPpHiRe*

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Oh, I only use photoshop when I NEED to. The picture in particular was a major failure per say. I tried with the light on, light off, flash on, flash off, a couple of different scenes... still came out bad. I usually do photo shoots with a set, and lights. I never used to need to adjust the camera settings for that. Since this example was a last minute thing, and we did pictures at my friend's house, I had nothing else but my camera with me. I'm new to my camera, so I need to learn how to use it appropriately icon_smile.gif.

Thanks for all the info! I'm definitely gonna learn all that stuff and put it to good use icon_smile.gif. <3

#100
Syntra

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QUOTE (*SaPpHiRe* @ Aug 22 2007, 11:11 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
awesome! thanks for the info icon_smile.gif I will experiment with that and give it a shot. <3<3<3

Oh, and i have a friend who's really pro at doing photo restoration, and he fixed this one for me:

before
http://www.brezoo.com/work/Restoration_001a.jpg
after
http://www.brezoo.com/work/Restoration_001b.jpg

he did an amaizing job, making the screwed up picture look like i wanted it to look like in the first place lol

See now the problem with that is its really grainy. Thats why its good to Overexpose. If you overexpose then lower the brightness, you have no grain. If you underexpose then up the brightness, what do you get?

Thats right, Grain.
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