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Anyone BMX?

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15 replies to this topic

#1
LordViperScorpioN

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I've been BMXing for about a year and i'm addicted.

Anyone else BMX?

#2
Pdah-m0vgli

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Nah, but I'm looking in to it... You got any tips for a beginner? There are not too many BMXers around you see ,P
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#3
LordViperScorpioN

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Depends...how tall are you?

#4
CrispyDuck411

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QUOTE (LordViperScorpioN @ Apr 13 2006, 03:34 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Depends...how tall are you?
>.>''
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#5
LordViperScorpioN

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go burn a duck icon_neutral.gif

#6
Pdah-m0vgli

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I'm almost 6 feet (2 meters), has it got something to say? I know of several tall breakers... =S
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#7
nlitement

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Whoa, 2 meters is over 6 feet. I'm over 180 cm and that's about precisely 6 feet. :)
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#8
LordViperScorpioN

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what kind of riding would you want to do?

Park? Street? Flatland?

Different bikes for different styles of riding

#9
Pdah-m0vgli

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Okey, I'm 185-190...

Well, what are the differences? =)

EDIT: Cool, this is my 888 post =D
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#10
DemomanScotboi

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just to clear things up.

a foot is 30cm.

so yea the finnish guy is right.

6 feet=180cm.

my bro does street.

he has a wtp Addict 2005

#11
LordViperScorpioN

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QUOTE (Pdah-m0vgli @ Apr 14 2006, 03:24 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Okey, I'm 185-190...

Well, what are the differences? =)

EDIT: Cool, this is my 888 post =D



WTP Addicts is pretty good. Street is what i ride too.

Taken from Wiki:

QUOTE
Street

Street riding, as its name suggests, occurs on the streets. Without purpose-made ramps, riders have to improvise with banks, walls, rails, gaps, etc. In fact, almost anything can be used as a BMX obstacle, and it is precisely this that draws people to street riding. Riders enjoy street riding because they are not constrained to what a skatepark designer has planned for them to ride, so it allows a good deal of creativity. Street riding relentlessly progresses, with obstacles and tricks that were considered too big or technical to attempt becoming common place even amongst young, amateur riders do this tricks to show off an get attention.

Many professional BMXers are street riders who are employed for the exposure they get through video parts and magazines, rather than for their competition results. However, these riders generally don't get paid the huge sums that the big competition riders get, since their exposure is only to the niche audience of other BMXers.

Many street riders however cross over into other genres of riding such as park, vert, and most commonly dirt jumping. Most often the dirt section of BMX is overlooked due to the fact that during video shoots the riders are unable to access the dirt jumps and are generally restricted to street


QUOTE
Park

Skateparks are used by BMXers as well as skateboarders, and both draw inspiration from the other. Skateparks themselves can be made of wood or concrete, or in the case of local council-supplied parks, metal. However, serious riders prefer wood and concrete since metal offers little traction, and generally metal parks are poorly designed, aimed more towards young children.

Styles of riding will differ between wood and concrete parks - wood lends itself to technical tricks, while concrete is more suited to a fast, flowing style, with riders searching for gaps, and aiming to air higher from the coping. However, it is not unusual for riders to merge the two styles in either type of park.

Concrete parks are commonly built outdoors due to their ability to withstand years of exposure to the elements. Concrete parks are also often publicly funded due to their permanent and costly nature. Parks made from wood are popular with commercial skateparks due to ease of construction, availability of materials, cost, and the relative safety associated with falling on wood instead of concrete. Parks designed with BMX use in mind will typically have steel coping that is less prone to damage than concrete or pool coping.

Common obstacles include quarter pipes, spines, flat banks, wall rides and miniramps. (Hover mouse over names for a description)


QUOTE
Trails

Also referred to as 'dirt jumping' (although many maintain that a subtle difference exists in the style of the riders performing each: trails riders focus more of flow and stylish tricks, while dirt jumpers try to perform the craziest tricks they can without much thought of the style). Dirt jumps (or trails) are, as the name suggests, jumps built from dirt (really compacted mud). The jumps consist of a steep take off, called a lip, with an often slightly less steep landing. The lip and landing are usually built as separate mounds, divided by a gap. The gap is measured from the topmost part of the lip, horizontally to the topmost part of the far side of the landing. Gaps typically range from only a couple of feet to over twenty feet. A moderate gap is around twelve feet.

Although many regard trails and street as being as close as possible to opposites in BMX, the attraction is similar - trails riders build their own jumps so their riding is limited only by their creativity. The main difference in terms of riding style is that trails riders strive for fluidity and smoothness, while street riders are more interested in 'getting it done' i.e. style doesn't matter as long as you can ride out of the trick.

These dirt riders also generally evolve into park and vert riders since tricks and style are much harder to accomplish on dirt than on man made ramps. Once one has mastered the dirt style they generally tend to migrate into the park section of BMX because the tricks that they have mastered in dirt are easier on man made ramps and the riders can progress their style even further.


QUOTE
Flatland

Flatland occupies a position somewhat removed from the rest of freestyle bmx. People who ride in the above disciplines will generally take part in at least one of the others, but flatlanders tend to only ride flatland. They are often very dedicated and will spend several hours a day perfecting their technique.

Flatland also differs from the others in that the terrain used is nothing but a smooth, flat surface. Tricks are performed by spinning and balancing on the bike in a variety of unexpected positions. Riders almost always use gnurled aluminum pegs to stand on to manipulate the bike into even stranger positions.

Flatland bikes typically have a shorter wheelbase than other freestyle bikes. This shorter wheelbase requires less effort to make the bike spin or to position the bike on one wheel. One of the primary reasons flatlanders ride often ride only flatland is a result of the decreased stability of using a shorter bike on ramps, dirt and street.

A variety of options are commonly found on flatland bikes. The most unifying feature of flatland bikes is the use of four pegs, one on the end of each wheel axle. Flatland riders will choose to run either a front brake, a rear brake, both brakes, or no brakes at all, depending on stylistic preference.


Street is by far the most fun and the ones of the easiest to get started in.

#12
Pdah-m0vgli

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Street...
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#13
LordViperScorpioN

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QUOTE

Colors: Black or Tan,MSRP: $379.99
-Full chromoly frame and fork
-Tig Welded Frame and Fork
-Internal headset
-14mm Axles
-Cassette hub
-33/12 gearing
-48-hole double-wall alloy rims
-Sealed press-fit internal BB
-3pc chromoly cranks
-1pr of pegs
-Eastern seat and grips
-20.75" toptube
-Weight: 29 lbs.


Overall a very respectable bike that'll probably last you a while. Good for street and pretty light

QUOTE


This one slightly less expensive but the parts aren't as good. I owned one for a short while and a lot of the parts started busting out on me. I'm a hard rider though, so depending on your style it might last you longer.

QUOTE

-100% 4130 Cromo Pro Frame
-Single and Double Butted Tubing
-20.5" Top Tube
-Integrated FSA Impact Headset
-Sealed Spanish BB
-100% 4130 Cromo Fork
-3 Pc Tubular Cromo Cranks
-Cassette Hub
-36/13 Chain Drive Setup
-Rear CP Rim
-HB Skidmark Tires
-2 Pairs of HB SPC Pegs
-MSRP: 279.99$


This bike is quite a good beginner bike. It does have cranks similar to the ones i busted last year but I was doing some pretty harsh riding. This is probably the best bang for you buck.

Prices are in USD

Depending on how serious you are about it and how much money you're willing to put into it, i could recommend some more stuff

#14
Pdah-m0vgli

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I was thinking about using... Humm... About what that blue one costs... I would try to find one used, but what uses to be the effects of a used BMX?
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#15
LordViperScorpioN

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buying used can be tricky..you kinda have to know about bikes to be able to buy used stuff otherwise you might get crap

#16
Pdah-m0vgli

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You know of any stuff I should watch out for in a used?
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